Happy Calm and Easy Homemade Playdough Recipe

Play dough has got to be one of my must-have parenting items. Along with Lego and a library of course! But I’ll write more about must haves another time πŸ™‚

This is a simple recipe using easy to find ingredients and including another twist which I find makes the experience more enjoyable for both parents and children – oil blends!

Choose and mix your own colours, oil blends, and quantities according to your wishes. This makes enough for about 1&1/2 cups of dough, and I like it because even toddlers can make it themselves! And they smell gorgeous and not like salt or oil haha!

Ingredients;

  • 1 cup water
  • Β½ cup cooking salt 
  • 1 tbs cream of tartar
  • 1 tbs coconut oil
  • 1 cup flour
  • A few drops of essential oil/s of choice (a few different ones can be used) – if desired
  • 2 or three drops each of your choice of food colouring (if desired). Use 4-5 drops for a stronger colour.

My oil blend of choice for kids!


Method;

  1. Heat water, oil, salt and cream of tartar in a pan over low-medium heat, until salt is mostly dissolved (if not entirely dissolved).
  2. Remove pan from stove and add flour, mixing quickly to form dough. 
  3. Remove from pan and place on a play board or similar, and knead for a couple of minutes. Section into desired number of portions for your different colour/oil blend combinations. Roll into balls.
  4. Use your finger to poke a hole in the Centre of each ball, dropping in food colouring and/or oils of choice. Knead carefully, until thoroughly combined. I usually make 4 balls out of this size mixture.
  5. Now play! And be sure to seal in an airtight container or bag – they should last 4-6 months. 

    Half mixed blue

Completely mixed and ready to have fun!

Have fun!

C xx

Caramel Beef Curry Family Friendly Recipe!

Prep: 2 minutes Cook Time: 40 minutes

Caramel Beef Curry on a bed of cabbage and snow peas!


Another beautiful kitchen experiment turned winning recipe! 

This is a basic (very) mild curry which the family will love – I usually make meat dishes to last our family over 3 meals so that’s why the amount of beef is 1-1.2kgs. Half the recipe if desired.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbs coconut oil
  • 1 large fresh garlic glove, minced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 heaped tsp turmeric (ground)
  • 1 heaped tsp cumin (ground)
  • 1&Β½ heaped tsp Garam Masala powder
  • 1-1.2kgs beef, cubed 
  • Pinch salt
  • Approx β…” cup pitted dates
  • 1 can coconut milk

Method;

  1. Heat the oil in a large pot, add the garlic and bay leaves and cook until the garlic is gently browned. Add spices and stir for 45 seconds then add beef.
  2. Brown beef on high heat with spices, turning as necessary. Add salt. Cover.
  3. Bring meat to the boil and continue boiling for 5-10 minutes. Stir and cover. Then add dates and bring to the boil again with lid on pot, then add coconut milk, stir, cover and bring to the boil again.
  4. Stir thoroughly then reduce heat to a bubbling simmer for 30 minutes. Stir appropriately every 5 minutes to 10 minutes. Keep pot lid on but tilt it to allow steam to escape. Sauce should be noticibly thicker but not thick and lumpy, or to the other extreme – runny like water!
  5. Remove from heat and allow to sit with lid tilted for 5-10 minutes before serving.

To serve: thinly slice some raw cabbage and raw snow peas and place them on the plate to form a bed to dollop the curry over – yum! Add some rice or bread to the side if required as well πŸ™‚

To Taste:

If you like a stronger curry taste simply add a diced onion in when cooking the garlic initially, and double your spices when adding them.
Enjoy!

C xx

12 Travel Tips for Parents when visiting Japan

After returning from our second holiday in Japan (now affectionately known as our “Japanniversary”), I have some handy tips for all of you parents out there to save you time, energy, frustration or embarrassment for your visit to Japan. On this visit we were able to spend time again in Osaka and Kyoto, as well as Nara. Next trip we’re hoping to head to Kobe, up to Sapporo, and most probably to visit our pen pals in Osaka again.


Points for Parents;

  1. Stay hydrated! Since we spent most of our days walking with our eyes wide open and concentrating on the sights and our senses were occupied, we didn’t drink enough and this may effect the little ones more than you. Just a word though, the tap Water is chlorinated, within “safe” levels.
  2. Everything regarding the public transport is so efficient – don’t stuff it up by standing on the left or boarding before others leave the train/bus.
  3. Nishiki Markets in Kyoto are a must do as well but if you have more than 2 small children consider giving it a miss if they can’t handle squashy crowds. Samples and demonstrations are plenty and the food range is awesome.
  4. Proteins & fats are hard to come by  in restaurants and more expensive in supermarkets – considering that weight training and daily movement are part of our family lifestyle, we generally do well on consuming more protein and fats. However, staples for the Japanese are predominantly carbohydrates so bear this in mind. We took along some hydrolysed collagen to help out. Super greens won’t hurt either if you’re used to eating a lot of fresh fruit and vegetables and won’t have access to your own kitchen.
  5. If you’re a coffee snob like myself, consider taking along an aeropress and your own ground coffee if you’ll have access to a kettle. ‘%’ coffee in Arashiyama is excellent, but be prepared to wait atleast 30 minutes as the line often twists out the door & around the corner. ‘LILO Coffee’ in Amerikamura (Osaka) is also a must for coffee lovers.
  6. Teach your children manners – it is normal for people in Japan to be respectful and display manners and courtesy at all times. If you show and teach your children what is acceptable, you’ll find the experience all the more pleasant.
  7. If you’re heading to Osaka an absolute MUST is to take your children to the Kids Plaza Osaka! Perfect on rainy days it’s a 3 level discovery & play Centre you could probably spend 3 days in if they wanted to experience each activity to its fullest. Ages 3 & up is best I think, however there are stations for babies/toddlers which are lovely too. Nature, Science, Culture, Technology, Imagination… everything is physically and mentally engaging. Perfect. The ticket price is more than worth it and well within budget! The link is here; http://www.kidsplaza.or.jp/en/
  8. Another few awesome attractions are the Arashiyama Monkey Park (Arashiyama is approx 25/35minute bus ride from Kyoto) a 160m climb with a mountain top park which protects Japanese Macaques, and Nara Park (5 minutes walk from Nara train station) which is filled with temples, museums, historical buildings, and wild deer roaming free. A word of warning – please please please pay attention to the signage with instruction on how to treat the animals – we witnessed a number of close calls simply because people ignored warnings. They are still wild animals. Make sure you and your children respect them, please. Then there’s the Osaka Castle and citizens park – so much to see in the grounds & surrounds as well as the brilliance of the castle itself.
  9. Be aware of smoking & non smoking in restaurants – if this is an issue for you please keep an eye out for the ash trays on tables, especially if you’re not confident with your pronounciation of “can we have non-smoking please”, or don’t recognize the characters. A positive note though, in public areas and all playgrounds there are designated “Manners Stations” where smokers must smoke – I love these as it’s easy to move your children from those areas when smokers arrive.
  10. Kimonos versus Yukatas – so both are traditional dress however the Kimono is more formal and the Yukata more casual. For both males & females of all ages. But be aware, Kimonos can be worn incorrectly which may offend, so if you’re hiring one please have the attendant dress you or help you. Kimonos are also considerably more expensive and custom made to order according to your social status. The Yukata is much more affordable (and easier to put on) as a souvenir if you’re wanting to purchase something like that. Prices range from $45aud and up where as Kimonos start in the 100’s and 1000’s. 

    The Yukata is more casual

  11. Dining – everywhere is good. Haha! Some better than others but if you’ve never been to a “real” automated sushi train please do – the kids will love using the screen/tablet to order and the speed at which the made-to-order dishes come along the track.
  12. Take a phrase book or app – as with most countries, an attempt to speak the language is welcomed and often you’ll be able to get by piece by piece even if the person you’re speaking to doesn’t know any English.

I highly recommend Japan as a destination so please go and please enjoy! 

Xx C

Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls: Book Review

It finally arrived today! Here in Australia we’ve had to wait until April to receive this wonderful new storybook. Not just for girls or teens, but for everyone πŸ™‚

Unfortunately, this book has received labeling (in positive praise of course!) using the term “anti-princess“. While that may be the view of some, I personally think it’s less anti-princess, less “rebel”, but more pro-action, pro-self belief, pro-game-changer, and pro-female.

The stories of each of the 100 inspiring women from around the world are just as the title suggests, and follow a simple, bed-time story format. Easy to read and interesting even for toddlers, each story reveals the lesson or value each person has given to the world in a way that is easy for young minds to digest. 

I personally think it’s less anti-princess, less “rebel”, but more pro-action, pro-self belief, pro-game-changer, and pro-female.

The illustrations on each double page spread are unique to the woman they portray. Completely different styles created (as expected) by 60 women around the world. Simply gorgeous.

After reading only 2 or 3 stories my 7yo decided to write and illustrate her own story (about her) in the allotted pages at the back of the book – very cool πŸ™‚

Highly recommended for all ages πŸ™‚

C xx

Buy it here !!*

Happy Reading!!

* Affiliate link used.

10 Phrases to use instead of “Don’t be Silly”.

** 5 minute read **

I’m tired of hearing people say “Don’t be silly” to their kids. 
I believe children aren’t trying to be silly nor are they trying to embarrass or annoy us. They are simply being children and more often than not are trying to have fun! Or, equally as often, have simply not been shown or modeled the expected behavior or required boundary. I often also hear this phrase used when children are presenting ideas, thoughts, and feelings. Can you imagine how you’d feel if you were told “Don’t be Silly!!!” in a firm and unpleasant or even condescending tone when you were presenting a keynote to a group? Or when you’d been injured and mentioned the pain? Or were crying because of grief or sadness?

Here I give you some alternative phrases to help guide your child and maybe recognize your own need in a situation as well.

1. Wow! – How easy is this one? Put a smile on your face and secure yourself a few seconds to judge your next parenting step, whether it’s a safety, health, or behavior issue.

2. Please use an “inside voice”. (Followed by a reason, if possible) – No explanation needed.

3. That really hurt, didn’t it? It’s ok to cry to let out the pain. (Folllwed by breathing with the tummy or whichever calm-down method you use). – Sometimes I even tell a story of when I got hurt a similar way as a child & kabam! Crying stops and play continues.

4. Looks like you’ve put so much effort in to that! – Another simple one which really only requires you pay attention to what they’re doing to supply an appropriate reaction. No need to judge their creation, just show them you know they’ve put in an effort and be encouraging and supportive by using this phrase.

5. Are you excited? Or, You look so excited! – I allow my children feelings of excitement, and naming the emotion allows them to identify it. As they grew older, their squealing reduced and bright, bold statements of “I’m so excited!!!!” Came out instead. A lot easier when you’re in crowded places as well!

6. Let’s stay calm. – Saying this out loud will also help you stay calm and remember to be the adult and be the parent. I’m saying this from experience!

7. In the ____place name____ is where we sit on our bottoms/in the chair/stand in line/etc. – Attaching a behavior to a location can be very helpful. Consistency also helps with this particular phrase.

8. What makes you think/feel that? – You’ll be surprised at what you discover using this phrase. Especially if your child is 4/5+ years old, then simply “work it out together” as I like to say.

9. You’re upset! (Followed by ‘Come here and let’s talk about it’) – In the same way as point 5 works, giving a name to the feeling is the first step in being able to identify and manage their emotions. 

10. Try telling me in a clear speaking voice (or if your child has a connection to a favorite adult or character who always speaks clearly, try using them as an example). Forget baby talk or either of you competing in a bout of demands and yelling. Encouraging clear articulation and making a point of its importance simply sets your child up for the future and it makes things SO much easier for you!

I’ve found these phrases work like magic and in addition to that, the children don’t feel shamed, confused, guilty, overwhelmed or overloaded, and they learn (slowly) what is expected. Win win win.

Xx C

Easy Mini Cheesecakes Recipe

It’s been a while since I posted any recipes so I thought I’d pop up this one as it’s a frequent request in my household πŸ™‚

This recipe is reduced sugar, and I’ve chosen all the ingredients from the supermarket with the least additives. To make it easier just go with products which have the most whole items or items you can pronounce, in the ingredients list. For example, the sour cream is only; Pasteurized cream, culture. Ideally, one might choose all gluten free and organic, or even sugar free, but sometimes we don’t always have access to these items so I’ve given the basic recipe here. Any plain biscuits work with this (I’ve tried making it with gluten free ginger nut biscuits and it comes up a treat). 

This takes about 10 mins to prep, 25 minutes to cook, and a few hours to cool. Making 24 in total. I always freeze half at least of them and thawed they’re just fine too.

Ingredients;

Base:

  • 250g plain biscuits (digestives, ginger nut, nice)
  • 140g butter, melted

Filling:

  • 2 x 250g cream cheese (at room temperature)
  • 300g sour cream
  • 3 x eggs
  • 3 tsp vanilla
  • β…“-Β½ cup raw sugar


Method
;

  1. Process biscuits in a food processor until fine, then add butter and mix until thoroughly combined.
  2. Line cupcake trays (2 x 12) with two paper liners each. Spoon base mixture evenly between them. I use about 1-2 teaspoons for each.
  3. Flatten with the back of your spoon then refrigerate while you prepare filling. (See picture). Preheat oven at 180 degrees Celsius.
  4. In a clean processor, combine cream cheese & sour cream until smooth.
  5. Add eggs, sugar and vanilla until just combined.
  6. Pour evenly into cupcake liners and bake for 25mins. Because I have to swap my top & bottom trays (small oven) I tend to bake them for 25-30 mins and they crack and lose some form but no-one complains lol!
  7. Remove from oven & allow to cool for at least an hour  before transferring to fridge or freezer. Set for 2-4 hours before eating.



You might like to top with cinnamon, or grated chocolate, or top with berries to serve.

Enjoy! Happy baking!!

Celese xx

Sew Busy in our house! Teaching life lessons with needles and chin ups.

Where to begin?! When life gets so overwhelming I had to let something go and unfortunately that was talking to you guys through this blog 😦 I’m sorry!

The loveliest thing though about my last 6 weeks was having my sister & nephew visit from out of town and training together, hanging out, and showing them a few of our homeschooling activities. The days have been packed so the whole family is looking forward to a few days off over the holiday season!

A few great focus areas for my two children have been sewing (the very latest obsession), rock climbing, developing chin up strength, and non violent communication. For me, alongside busy days with my children and managing some events for our community homeschool group I’ve been working my behind off trying to finish up some illustration jobs I’ve been commissioned to do, as well as compete in the grand final of my basketball league (we won!) and attend the Disney reunion down in Sydney (where I previously worked as an artist)! You’ll probably see the evidence in my Instagram feed – Phew it has been busy!


So I’m super happy about how my kidlets have been developing over the last two months as THE biggest lessons I’ve been trying to imprint on their ever-sponging brains are;

  • Have a plan/be prepared
  • Practice and persistence to achieve your goals
  • Words are like magic if you use them properly.

And these lessons, through every day activities, are sinking in! Yay!! 

Sewing has taught my two the pretty big lesson of having a plan, and being prepared. Oh how the tears did flow! Seam allowance, needle threading, hand sewing, placement of cut outs…. All the mistakes are being made and it’s wonderful as once the frustration has cleared we can talk it through and do better next time. 

Chin ups are a big focus right now – for some reason they’ve been something my two have latched onto through watching myself and my husband train at the gym. Practice and persistence come up very regularly in most activities or pursuits but chin ups have been demanding and the joy of reaching goals has been sweet! My eldest can now do more than me!!! Talk about confidence booster! And because this is something it’s not possible for me to help them with it’s been extra special as they’ve achieved all by themselves πŸ™‚ and the goal posts can always be moved to achieve more if they wish ❀️❀️❀️

And finally, this is a long running, always continuing lesson which I’m still learning for myself! The power of words! Now that my littlest is 3&Β½ she’s coming to a stage where she has her own opinion, she wants to lead and direct what she is doing, and her independence is growing. So, therefore the disagreements come thick and fast some days and we need to learn to master our communication. This is a work in progress that’s for sure! 

I’ve been so happy to see the progress with my two I just had to share!!! 

Did you find any activities in particular helped your own children with perseverance, preparation, or communication?

Would love to hear if you did πŸ™‚

C xx

Why “Moana” is Disney’s Best Children’s Film Yet

Moana: A Mother’s Review;

I’m a parent of two very different children, and I wear my high alert parenting goggles when I watch or choose films with my kids. I have chosen to be a Conscious Parent and I know children take a lot from movies whether we realize what/how much of it or not. I’ll be writing about how we watch movies in a separate post πŸ˜‰

As I’m sure most of you know, Western, English speaking “children’s” films leave a lot to be desired when it comes to role models. On the whole I have been gobsmacked at watching only the 2 minute trailers for children’s films over the last 10 years because of the increase in endless violence, sexism/gender bias, terrible role models, and severity of character-on-character mistreatment both verbally and emotionally – and it’s all made out to be funny. It is just incredible 😦

But – never fear dear parents! A great film has arrived in Disney’s latest creation – Moana. I will be putting together a list of great films for conscious parents soon (why didn’t I do that earlier?!?!?!) but for now I’ll give you the bullet points as I know you don’t have much time!

1. Strong Role Model

This won me over for point number one as Moana displays so many admirable qualities. She’s physically, mentally and emotionally strong. She must overcome many barriers, trust her instinct, and believe in herself. Despite the fact she yearns for the sea and exploration she does so in wanting to be a better leader for her family and village as opposed to fighting or rebellion. And she’s not “super sexy” or sassy anything like that πŸ™‚

Any “attitude” throughout the entire film is only character frustration or misunderstandings as opposed to plain rudeness or malice. So the biggest things my two kidlets are repeating/taking from this film are; trying to be better swimmers (yay!), being strong, trying hard, courage, females being in positions of great responsibility, seeing through the pain of others, and well, the words “butt cheek” did enter the eldest’s vocabulary but I’m not complaining about that with everything else she’s taken away from the film.

2. Presention of Culture

Although this story and characters (I believe) are not intended to represent a specific South Pacific Island or specific Nationality, I believe that the overall presentation of the island way of life, the region, and peoples to be positive and in many ways true. Happiness, sharing, reliance on the coconut, roles within the community, dancing… And the hair – my daughter wants hair like Moanas now, and even as I write this my youngest is covering her arms with removeable sticker tattoos, haha!! I was easily able to discuss and relate my children to SO many aspects of the movie (from the boats to the dancing, tattoos, language, roles within a village community, etc) not only because of our trips to New Zealand but because I have dear friends from the South Pacific Islands and we (myself and my children) are always involved in cultural and global exploration in order to widen their circle of knowledge, wisdom and tolerance. Moana is definitely a step in the right direction when it comes to exposing your children to this regions peoples if they aren’t already πŸ™‚ And I believe it’s also possible to research the less Americanized/Disney-fied versions of the story of the Demi-God ‘Maui’, for example, if you wish to further educate yourself.


3. No Unnecessary Violence and Minimal SlapStick Humor

What a relief to be able to watch a film without constantly reassuring my children that “we don’t hit others like that”, for example. I think there are two points in the film where it comes close. But this was a huge part of the appeal of this film as well as we saw that it’s only necessary to fight in self defense as opposed to attack or to be funny or provoke others. Or most importantly, when we can’t use our words effectively.

Thank you, Moana Directors, for this!

Oops, I must note though that a few scenes may frighten young children so please cuddle tight and answer their questions through those. I’d recommend ages 4 to 5 and older watch this one.

4. Great Story

Easy to follow for the children, and as I say in both points 7 & 9 the lessons were obvious, and it’s a wonderful coming of age story. I personally am happy the main character is female, too, since I have daughters πŸ™‚

As I said in an earlier point it’s a Disney-fied version of a legend, so, research further for the history behind it. Or otherwise simply go and enjoy the film! 

5. Visually Breathtaking

I’ve recently started following Andy Harkness, the creative Director behind this masterpiece, and I would have to say I’m very impressed with pretty much every element. And when you do watch it – check out the amazing texture, look and movement of the hair and also water! I just wanted to touch it all!

6. Beautiful Music

Moana and the supporting characters have far easier voices to handle. This thankfully is not a repeat of Frozen. And yes, I do have the Frozen soundtrack. And yes, I do know all the words.

Secondly the mixture of languages was refreshing and also for my children, exciting. They appreciate the culture behind the music and I think that’s a wonderful thing!

7. Lessons Are Clearer

What I’ve actually noticed with a lot of kids films (Disney’s included) is that there are a LOT of underlying themes that simply go straight over the heads of our children but not without first modeling unwanted behaviors and adding confusion or inappropriate themes to their minds. And no, I’m not a “way out hippy”, or extremely religious, or extreme anything type of parent, I’m just aware of what they’re digesting, processing and regurgitating!

8. No Hate

In this world where there is so much hatred I find it refreshing that Moana doesn’t promote hate or a separatist attitude. Love it.

9. Easy to Explain or Expand On

Winning! Even after the 3rd viewing my children still have “why” questions and I find it is so easy to explain the answers and explore the topic/question raised. We do this with all films but I’ve found this very easy to parent through πŸ™‚

10. Appropriate Themes

Following on from the last point, I don’t have to explain the ins and outs of themes they’re too little to understand or shouldn’t even be exposed to.
That just about sums it all up! I hope that what I’ve shared was helpful for you in choosing whether or not to show this film to your children. But as I’ve said I really do think it’s their best film yet πŸ™‚

*This review is my personal opinion and I have no monetary affiliation with Disney. 

Easy Chicken PΓ’tΓ© Recipe

A family favorite of ours is this easy chicken liver pate recipe. My children go in and out of their taste for this depending on what their body needs but it’s a great side dish full of vitamins, protein and yummy-ness. Clearly I enjoy it πŸ˜‰


Ingredients;

  • 300-500g chicken livers, sliced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • 1 small-medium onion sliced thinly
  • 1 clove garlic, finely diced
  • 1 tbs Butter
  • Fresh rosemary / mixed dried herbs / fresh oregano / your favorite French herb mix (approx 1-2 tsp)
  • ΒΌ to β…“ cup pouring cream
  • Optional: 1 tbs brandy 

Method;

  1. SautΓ© onion and garlic in butter before adding bay leaves, cook for a few minutes.
  2. Add chicken livers, cook for 5 minutes. Add herbs and salt and pepper. 
  3. Stir livers then cook until just done. Remove bay leaves.
  4. If adding brandy, do so now then light with a match or lighter in order to burn off the alcohol, then simmer for a few minutes until well incorporated into the mix.
  5. Remove from heat and then allow to cool for a few minutes before moving everything into a food processor or blender (I use a stick blender). Add cream and process until smooth. 
  6. Pour into a glass bowl/container and refrigerate for a few hours until firm. 

Enjoy!! Xx

Nature, Numbers, and Caterpillar Bites

The caterpillar that bit me πŸ™‚

Today while we were creating some art outside on the patio a very hungry caterpillar bit my leg. 

Crazy, I know! I’ve never been bitten by one before and in truth it was just searching for food after falling on to me. As far as I know my legs aren’t green enough to be mistaken for leaves, haha! But it tickled, and it was definitely a surprise! But the by far the strongest experience my girls took from witnessing that event was that it is a wonder and exciting to be in touch with nature – all because of my response to the incident. As parents who are busy “doing”, and have already developed certain behaviors (which, can still be adjusted by the way!) we often forget the impact of our actions – however small – has an enormous effect on our children’s experience of life. It sounds like a big call, but it isn’t. It’s the truth.

I could have squealed, shouted, hit the caterpillar off my leg, displayed nervousness or fright, and been upset. But what I did do, was turn slowly, obviously surprised at the sensation, and said “Wow! It’s trying to find food and is biting my leg! Ha! It tickles (which it did) – I’ve never felt THAT before! Look girls, look! (With excitement and smiles) take a good look before I pop it back into the leaves… It’s not hairy or spikey so I know it won’t harm me, but it does seem VERY hungry!”.

One thing I did notice before I even started to respond was the gasp from my eldest as she looked to me for the appropriate action or response (she saw it first). It was only a split second but I caught it and that reminded me to pour intent into my reaction. It worked!

They then rushed happily for a closer look and smiles beamed from their little faces. It’s a pretty strong imprint which will help build their curiosity, confidence and ease in nature.

If I had’ve reacted differently as I mentioned first, I then teach my children to become scared and withdrawn from the natural world, and to hurt things. Personally I want more for my children, and for them to respect our connection with nature and enjoy it.

But on to the numbers…

So one of the biggest missing components of many modern children is said to be “time in nature”. So to combat this issue our activities outside today focused on nature itself. Some chalk drawing of course, but then we created a graph of the insects we could see in our small garden bed by creating a table with a drawing and label of each insect, searching and counting then tallying them, then creating a bar graph and pie chart. Easy and fun, outside in the sunshine πŸ™‚


I would have a picture to show you of the graph we made but for the life of me I can’t find it!! 

Enjoy the sunshine my friends Xx